Beyond Capital

Workers' needs expand as a function of the growth of capital. As Marx noted in the Grundrisse, ... Capital drives beyond 'all traditional, confined, complacent, encrusted satisfactions of present needs, and reproductions ...

Beyond Capital

Beyond Capital

Winner of The Deutscher Memorial Prize 2004. In a completely reworked edition of his classic (1991) volume, Michael A. Lebowitz explores the implications of the book on wage-labour that Marx originally intended to write. Focusing upon critical assumptions in Capital that were to be removed in Wage-Labour and upon Marx's methodology, Lebowitz stresses the one-sidedness of Marx's Capital and argues that the side of the workers, their goals and their struggles in capitalism have been ignored by a monolithic Marxism characterized by determinism, reductionism and a silence on human experience.

Beyond Capital and Labor

Output can increase over time for a given capital and a fixed number of natural units of labor. The production function and growth function with Harrod neutral technological progress are essentially the same as Solow neutral case except ...

Beyond Capital and Labor

Beyond Capital and Labor

Originally published in 1995, Beyond Capital Labor is a comprehensive empirical study about how and how much technology and regional contextual factors may influence company production and productivity growth. The book constitutes a conceptually consistent and empirically efficient study and provides a consolidated model and an analytical framework to examine the contributions of technology and regional factors to company production and productivity growth. This work goes beyond the current state and brings many scattered theoretical components together to establish an integrated model.

The New Dialectic and Marx s Capital

28 Mészáros, I 1995 Beyond Capital, p. 621. 29 Mészáros, I 1995 Beyond Capital, p. 494. 30 Mészáros, I 1995 Beyond Capital, p. 369. 31 Mészáros, I 1995 Beyond Capital, p. 981. 32 Mészáros, I 1995 Beyond Capital, p. 630.

The New Dialectic and Marx s Capital

The New Dialectic and Marx s Capital

This book argues that the dialectic of Marx's Capital has a systematic, rather than historical, character. It sheds new light on Marx's great work, while going beyond it in many respects.

The End of Western Hegemonies

On the causes of the implosion, see Beyond Capital, 662. 162 According to Mészáros, Communism was only another type of capital system, “Soviettype capital system.” Capitalism is a mode of production: the Soviet one was postcapitalist.

The End of Western Hegemonies

The End of Western Hegemonies

In the face of recent trends like growing authoritarianism and xenophobic nationalism, the rise of the Far Right, the explosion of economic and social inequalities, heightened geopolitical contest and global capitalism’s endless crisis, and the impacts of shocks like the Covid-19 pandemic, discourses about the ‘decline of the West’ no more look like mere ruminations of a handful of cultural depressives and politically disillusioned; they sound increasingly realistic. This volume addresses this issue by mapping and analyzing the forms, mechanisms, strategies, and effects, in the past, the present, and the future, of Western hegemonies, namely, asymmetrical relations that bring advantages or, at least, secure the superiority of Western state and non-state actors in politics, economics, and culture broadly understood. Over the past decades and centuries, Westerners never ceased claiming supremacy in all these spheres. A host of these relations were initiated through colonialism and imperialism, and perpetuated through informal imperialism, but there are other channels: political interference, inequalities between countries, and attempts at affirming the supremacy of the so-called Western way of life was also secured through the military might and economic power of great Western actors. This book explores sites of Western hegemonies and contributes to understanding the mechanisms through which international hierarchies are formed and maintained. Bringing together the research of scholars from various fields in the humanities and social sciences, political science, international relations, political philosophy, sociology, history, postcolonial studies, criminology, and linguistics, this volume develops a multidisciplinary outlook on the issue of Western hegemonies that allows uncovering resemblances between various forms of asymmetrical relations and their mechanisms.

The Necessity of Social Control

István Mészáros, Beyond Capital: Towards a Theory of Transition (New York: Monthly Review Press, 1995). Daniel Singer, “After Alienation,” The Nation, June 10, 1996, http://www.thenation.com/ article/after-alienation; István Mészáros, ...

The Necessity of Social Control

The Necessity of Social Control

As John Bellamy Foster writes in his foreword to the present book, “István Mészáros is one of the greatest philosophers that the historical materialist tradition has yet produced. His work stands practically alone today in the depth of its analysis of Marx’s theory of alienation, the structural crisis of capital, the demise of Soviet-style post-revolutionary societies, and the necessary conditions of the transition to socialism. His dialectical inquiry into social structure and forms of consciousness—a systematic critique of the prevailing forms of thought—is unequaled in our time.” Mészáros is the author of magisterial works like Beyond Capital and Social Structures of Forms of Consciousness, but his work can seem daunting to those unacquainted with his thought. Here, for the first time, is a concise and accessible overview of Mészáros’s ideas, designed by the author himself and covering the broad scope of his work, from the shortcomings of bourgeois economics to the degeneration of the capital system to the transition to socialism.

Toward a Dialectic of Philosophy and Organization

C. Istvan Mészáros and the Dialectic: Seeking to Move Beyond Capital by Moving Beyond Hegel From almost the very fijirst moment of his Beyond Capital (1995)—Chapter One, “Breaking the Spell of 'Universal Permanent Capital' ”—Mészáros ...

Toward a Dialectic of Philosophy and Organization

Toward a Dialectic of Philosophy and Organization

In Toward a Dialectic of Philosophy and Organization revolutions and revolutionary movements of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries are examined through the lens of the Hegelian-Marxian dialectic(s) and Marx’s concept of revolutionary organization.

The Ecological Rift

István Mészáros, The Necessity of Social Control (London: Merlin Press, 1971), later published as a chapter in Beyond Capital. Also see, Donella Meadows, Dennis H. Meadows, Jørgen Randers, and William W. Behrens III, The Limits to ...

The Ecological Rift

The Ecological Rift

Humanity in the twenty-first century is facing what might be described as its ultimate environmental catastrophe: the destruction of the climate that has nurtured human civilization and with it the basis of life on earth as we know it. All ecosystems on the planet are now in decline. Enormous rifts have been driven through the delicate fabric of the biosphere. The economy and the earth are headed for a fateful collision—if we don't alter course. In The Ecological Rift: Capitalism’s War on the Earth environmental sociologists John Bellamy Foster, Brett Clark, and Richard York offer a radical assessment of both the problem and the solution. They argue that the source of our ecological crisis lies in the paradox of wealth in capitalist society, which expands individual riches at the expense of public wealth, including the wealth of nature. In the process, a huge ecological rift is driven between human beings and nature, undermining the conditions of sustainable existence: a rift in the metabolic relation between humanity and nature that is irreparable within capitalist society, since integral to its very laws of motion. Critically examining the sanguine arguments of mainstream economists and technologists, Foster, Clark, and York insist instead that fundamental changes in social relations must occur if the ecological (and social) problems presently facing us are to be transcended. Their analysis relies on the development of a deep dialectical naturalism concerned with issues of ecology and evolution and their interaction with the economy. Importantly, they offer reasons for revolutionary hope in moving beyond the regime of capital and toward a society of sustainable human development.

The Socialist Alternative

Lebowitz, Beyond CAPITAL, 178–81. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. Marx, Grundrisse, 694; Marx, Capital, vol. 1, 1053–54, 1058. Marx, Grundrisse, 488. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40.

The Socialist Alternative

The Socialist Alternative

“A good society,“ Michael Lebowitz tells us, “is one that permits the full development of human potential.” In this slim, lucid, and insightful book, he argues persuasively that such a society is possible. That capitalism fails his definition of a good society is evident from even a cursory examination of its main features. What comes first in capitalism is not human development but privately accumulated profits by a tiny minority of the population. When there is a conflict between profits and human development, profits take precedence. Just ask the unemployed, those toiling at dead-end jobs, the sick and infirm, the poor, and the imprisoned. But if not capitalism, what? Lebowitz is also critical of those societies that have proclaimed their socialism, such as the former Soviet Union and China. While their systems were not capitalist and were capable of achieving some of what is necessary for the “development of human potential,” they were not “good societies.” A good society as Lebowitz defines it must be marked by three characteristics: social ownership of the means of production, social production controlled by workers, and satisfaction of communal needs and purposes. Lebowitz shows how these characteristics interact with and reinforce one another, and asks how they can be developed to the point where they occur more or less automatically—that is, become both a society’s premises and outcomes. He also offers fascinating insights into matters such as the nature of wealth, the illegitimacy of profits, the inadequacies of worker-controlled enterprises, the division of labor, and much more.

The Contradictions of quot Real Socialism quot The Conductor and the Conducted

Lebowitz, Following Marx, 12415; Marx, Capital, 3:983; Marx, Capital, 1171 1, 713, 717, 732. Lebowitz, “The Missing Book on Wage-Labour,” in Beyond CAPITAL, 27450. Marx, Capital, 1:729430, 1064; Lebowitz,Beyond CAPITAL, 172*74.

The Contradictions of  quot Real Socialism quot   The Conductor and the Conducted

The Contradictions of quot Real Socialism quot The Conductor and the Conducted

In this concise volume, noted scholar and economist Michael A. Lebowitz considers the legacy of twentieth century socialist societies, or what some have termed ?real socialism.? While these societies were able to claim major achievements in areas from health care to education to popular culture, they nonetheless met limited success in eroding what Marx called the ?opposition of the worker as direct producer and the proprietor of the means of production.? That this opposition between workers and managers continued to exist in one form or another under ?real socialism? means that, according to L

Following Marx

Even though the needs which they attempt to satisfy do not in themselves go beyond capital, the very process of struggle is one of producing new people, of transforming them into people with a new conception of themselves – as subjects ...

Following Marx

Following Marx

Combining Marxa (TM)s focus upon the totality (and its appearance as capitals in competition) with specific applications in political economy, "Following Marx" demonstrates how the failure to understand Marxa (TM)s method has led astray many who consider themselves Marxists.

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Pages: 193
Authors: J. James
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Africa's Changing Agricultural Development Strategies
Language: en
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Authors: Christopher L. Delgado
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Similarities and dominant paradigms; Chronology and elements of the dominant paradigms of agricultural development; Insights for paradigms of African Agricultural Development.
World Bank
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