Under a Mackerel Sky

Shortlisted for the Specsavers National Book Awards 2013

Under a Mackerel Sky

Under a Mackerel Sky

‘All men should strive to learn before they die what they are running from, and to, and why’ Rick Stein's childhood in 1950s rural Oxfordshire and North Cornwall was idyllic. His parents were charming and gregarious, their five children much-loved and given freedom typical of the time. As he grew older, the holidays were filled with loud and lively parties in his parents' Cornish barn. But ever-present was the unpredicatible mood of his bipolar father, with Rick frequently the focus of his anger and sadness. When Rick was 18 his father killed himself. Emotionally adrift, Rick left for Australia, carrying a suitcase stamped with his father's initials. Manual labour in the outback followed by adventures in America and Mexico toughened up the naive public schoolboy, but at heart he was still lost and unsure what to do with his life. Eventually, Cornwall called him home. From the entrepreneurial days of his mobile disco, the Purple Tiger, to his first, unlikely unlikely nightclub where much of the time was spent breaking up drink-fuelled fights, Rick charts his personal journey in a way that is both wry and perceptive; engaging and witty. Shortlisted for the Specsavers National Book Awards 2013

Poems by Paul

Under. a. Mackerel. Sky. Further up the coast, to the rocky state of Maine The moon hugs the pine, in a solace state of wane The sun often hides, from the fog and the rain A silver grayish image, a mackerel sky to blame Heavy rain pours ...

Poems by Paul

Poems by Paul


Under a Mackerel Sky

Under a Mackerel Sky

Under a Mackerel Sky


Oxford Examined

Two male undergrads are conducting a conversation behind me in the interval. “Have you read the whole book?” “I don't read books. I've read the Wikipedia page. ... Under a mackerel sky. Someone buys an icecream in Argentina in 1973.

Oxford Examined

Oxford Examined

Repeatedly jamming his fork of curiosity into the live toaster of opportunity, comedian Richard O. Smith captures the experience of living in Oxford in probably the funniest book written about the Dreaming Spires. Collected here are 70 of his best Oxford Examined columns from the award-winning Oxford Times magazine Oxfordshire Limited Edition including several previously unpublished stories. In these unflinchingly truthful columns he meets celebrities (Kate Middleton, Dara O'Briain, the one who plays Phoebe in Friends and a predictably grumpy Alan Sugar), visits the 11th dimension with an Oxford University maths protégée, gatecrashes Encaenia, flirts with a Roman slave girl from 79AD, is ejected from the Oxford Union by burly security, witnesses a comeuppance for a pack of arrogant students, conducts a walking tour for Britain's scariest hen party, moves a library (which transpires to be harder work than moving a mountain), sees Britain's most pretentious theatre production, participates in the UK's national bell ringing championships (yes, that is a thing), allows Oxford University psychologists to experiment on him, rescues four escaped horses in a busy Oxford street (thankfully it wasn't the apocalypse), becomes a crime-fighting superhero, is hospitalised in a serious bike accident, gets chased by a furious revenge-fixated woman dressed as a Friesian cow, strides out of his house one morning and disappears down a giant sink hole, mentors two stand-up comedy virgins, commits a devastating social faux pas and pledges to never use a split infinitive or sentence this long again. 'Right from the introductory preamble, this is pure comedy genius. I dare anybody to read it and not start sniggering out loud. Warning: this may attract odd looks if you are on a bus or anywhere else in public.' --Oxford Times 'Bring together an outstanding comic writer and a city of unlikely people and you'll find the perfect love-match. The wittiest, zaniest, and most truthful guide to a city you'll read: armchair travel has never been so good. Or so funny.' --Susie Dent 'The funniest book ever about Oxford. Pure comedy genius. I read Oxford Examined and laughed so much.' --Gill Oliver, Oxford Mail

Under the Mackerel Sky

Under the Mackerel Sky

Under the Mackerel Sky


Love

Under this mackerel sky you and I Wonder about where Lent and Advent went Where do the days go when they have gone by? Maybe like us they retire to repent All I ask of God is that he love me (I rather think he already loves you) Here ...

Love

Love

Through a thousand nights of love into a thousand days of poetry, love came to me wearing its thousand faces and thrillingly whispering words into my heart. I wanted to remember them and to share them with you so I wrote them all down with the uttermost care as my uttermost offering, by love and for love with all of my heart. Those words were these poems which are this book of a thousand nights of love into a thousand days of poetry, written down with the uttermost care, to remember and to share. And even and especially when it might not seem so, all these words in all their thousand ways share as their source and destination love, wearing its thousand faces and thrillingly whispering words, these words, into your heart through mine. I made this book for you and it is yours now. It had to be called LOVE because it is. Take it. Love, +Steven

Magnetical and Meteorological Observations at Lake Athabasca and Fort Simpson

Soon afterwards the light had disappeared from the southern sky , and the auroral light was mostly in the north ... so as to be almost transparent , but appearing to the eye to not go It relie under the mackerel sky which it crossed .

Magnetical and Meteorological Observations at Lake Athabasca and Fort Simpson

Magnetical and Meteorological Observations at Lake Athabasca and Fort Simpson


Notes from Walnut Tree Farm

We pitched the pup-tents side by side on an almost-level sward and slept soundly in the silence under a mackerel-sky perforated by stars. Morning broke with a perfect blue sky and tiny fragments of puffy white cloud.

Notes from Walnut Tree Farm

Notes from Walnut Tree Farm

Notes from Walnut Tree Farm is a collection of writing by Roger Deakin For the last six years of his life, Roger Deakin kept notebooks in which he wrote his daily thoughts, impressions, feelings and observations about and around his home, Walnut Tree Farm. Collected here are the very best of these writings, capturing his extraordinary, restless curiosity about nature as well as his impressions of our changing world. 'Marvellous, wonderful, lovely, remarkable . . . to be read and reread and treasured' Elizabeth Jane Howard, Daily Mail 'Very funny, sharp-eyed. To look at the world through Deakin's eyes was to see somewhere that was more wonderful than it often appears' Sunday Telegraph 'Thoughtful and invigorating, full of humour, timeless . . . will take its place among the classics of Nature diaries . . . to be read alongside Frances Kilvert, Gilbert White, and Dorothy Wordsworth' Mail on Sunday 'Gentle, straight, honest, inquisitive, funny, melancholic' Spectator 'So busy and bustling with life' Observer 'A secular saint' The Times Roger Deakin, who died in August 2006, shortly after completing the manuscript for Wildwood, was a writer, broadcaster and film-maker with a particular interest in nature and the environment.He lived for many years in Suffolk, where he swam regularly in his moat, in the river Waveney and in the sea, in between travelling widely through the landscapes he writes about in Wildwood. He is the author of Waterlog, Wildwood and Notes from Walnut Tree Farm.

Rise Ye Sea Slugs

scrubbing slug beneath a mackerel sky, sunlight illuminates a tub of red and blue ones, and the finger test 423 こき~ ~と海鼠を洗ふ鰯雲萩原麦草#863 k[g]okik[g]oki to namako o arau iwashigumo – bakusô (1935) (gokigoki[hard objects ...

 Rise  Ye Sea Slugs

Rise Ye Sea Slugs

Rise, Ye Sea Slugs! is a book of many faces. First, it is a book of translated haiku and contains over 900 of these short Japanese poems in the original (smoothly inserted in the main body),with phonetic and literal renditions, as well as the authors English translations and explanations. All but a dozen or two of the haiku are translated for the first time. There is an index of poets, poems and a bibliography. Second, it is a book of sea slug haiku, for all of the poems are about holothurians, which scientists prefer to call sea cucumbers. (The word cucumber is long for haiku and metaphorically unsuitable for many poems, so poetic license was taken.) With this book, the namako, as the sea cucumber is called in Japanese, becomes the most translated single subject in haiku, surpassing the harvest moon, the snow, the cuckoo, butterflies and even cherry blossoms. Third, it is a book of original haiku. While the authors original intent was to include only genuine old haiku (dating back to the 17th century), modern haiku were added and, eventually, Keigu (Gills haiku name) composed about a hundred of his own to help fill out gaps in the metaphorical museum. For many if not most modern haiku taken from the web, it is also their first time in print! Fourth, it is a book of metaphor. How may we arrange hundreds of poems on a single theme? Gill divides them into 21 main metaphors, including the Cold Sea Slug, the Mystic Sea Slug, the Helpless Sea Slug, the Slippery Sea Slug, the Silent Sea Slug, and the Melancholy Sea Slug, giving each a chapter, within which the metaphors may be further subdivided, and adds a 100 pages of Sundry Sea Slugs (scores of varieties including Monster, Spam, Flying, Urban Myth, and Exploding). Fifth, it is a book on haiku. E ditors usually select only the best haiku, but, Gill includes good and bad haiku by everyone from the 17th century haiku master to the anonymous haiku rejected in some internet contest. This is not to say all poems found were included, but that the standard was along more taxonomic or encyclopedic lines: poems that filled in a metaphorical or sub-metaphorical gap were always welcome. Also, Gill shows there is more than one type of good haiku. These are new ways to approach haiku. Sixth, it is a book on translation. There are approximately 2 translations per haiku, and some boast a dozen. These arearranged in mixed single, double and triple-column clusters which make each reading seem a different aspect of a singular, almost crystalline whole. The authors aim is to demonstrate that multiple reading (such as found in Hofstadters Le Ton Beau de Marot) is not only a fun game but a bona fide method of translating, especially useful for translating poetry between exotic tongues. Seventh, it is a book of nature writing, natural history or metaphysics (in the Emersonian sense). Gill tried to compile relevant or interesting (not necessarily both) historical -- this includes the sea slug in literature, English or Japanese, and in folklore -- and scientific facts to read haiku in their light or, conversely, bringor wring out science from haiku. Unlike most nature writers, Gill admits to doing no fieldwork, but sluggishly staying put and relying upon reportsfrom more mobile souls. Eighth, it is a book about food symbolism. The sea cucumber is noticed by Japanese because they eat it; the eating itselfinvolves physical difficulties (slipperiness and hardness) and pleasures from overcoming them. It is also identified with a state of mind, where you are what you eat takes on psychological dimensions not found in the food literature of the West. Ninth, it is a book about Japanese culture. Gill does not set out to explain Japan, and the sea slug itself is silent;but the collection of poems and their explanations, which include analysis by poets who responded to the author's questions as well has historical sources, take us all around the culture, from ancient myths to contemporary dreams. Tenth, it is a book about sea cucumbers. While most species of sea cucumbers are not mentioned and the coverage of the Japanese sea cucumber is sketchy from the scientific point of view, Gill does introduce this animal graced to live with no brain thanks to the smart materials comprising it and blessed for sucking in dirty sediment and pooping it out clean. Eleventh, it is a book about ambiguity. Gill admits there is much that cannot be translated, much he cannot know and much to be improved in future editions, for which purpose he advises readers to see the on-line Glosses and Errata in English and Japanese. His policy is to confide in, rather than slip by the reader unnoticed, in the manner of the invisible modern translator and allow the reader to makechoices or choose to allow multiple possibilities to exist by not chosing.Twelfth, the book is the first of dozens of spin-offs from a twenty-book haiku saijiki (poetic almanac) called In Praise of Olde Haiku (IPOOH, for short) Gill hopes to finish within the decade. Thirteenth. The book is a novelty item. It has a different (often witty) header (caption) on top of each page and copious notes that are rarely academic and oftehumorous.

Beyond Sex and Soup

... known as a 'mackerel' sky. Never before had I seen sharp billed noisy seagulls show their strength and beauty with such grace, and never before had I seen these hungry keen-eyed fishing birds fly unconsciously under their fish!

Beyond Sex and Soup

Beyond Sex and Soup

A healer reveals powerful invisible ‘tools’ to expand your horizons and overcome personal challenges. Beyond Sex and Soup is about the beauty in you. The beauty is always there but sometimes shrouded by fear, anger, anxiety or pain. This story is also about death, the knowledge of which makes us so much more joyful about living. Anna Parkinson offers you tools to help you uncover the beauty from the everyday drama of your life. She has found them powerful for her own healing and her practice of healing others over the past fifteen years. Along the way, you’ll encounter some of the everyday drama of the author's own life and the characters it’s been her privilege to share the adventure with.

More Books:

Ben Hogan's Five Lessons
Language: en
Pages: 127
Authors: Ben Hogan
Categories: Sports & Recreation
Type: BOOK - Published: 1985-09-20 - Publisher: Simon and Schuster

The professional golfer provides tips on the grip, stance, and swing of successful golf shots
Ben Hogan's Five Lessons
Language: en
Pages: 128
Authors: Ben Hogan, Herbert Warren Wind
Categories: Sports & Recreation
Type: BOOK - Published: 1990-01-01 - Publisher: Simon and Schuster

A timeless classic with nearly one million copies in print, Ben Hogan’s Five Lessons outlines the building blocks of winning golf from one of the all-time masters of the sport—fully illustrated with drawings and diagrams to improve your game instantly. Ben Hogan, one of the greatest golfers in the history
And If You Play Golf, You're My Friend
Language: en
Pages: 173
Authors: Harvey Penick, Bud Shrake, Edwin Shrake
Categories: Sports & Recreation
Type: BOOK - Published: 1993 - Publisher: Simon and Schuster

Offers an instructional guide to the world of golf for beginners and advanced players alike, filled with practical tips, tested wisdom, and plain common sense.
Library Journal
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Harvey Penick, Bud Shrake, Edwin Shrake
Categories: Libraries
Type: BOOK - Published: 1990 - Publisher:

Includes, beginning Sept. 15, 1954 (and on the 15th of each month, Sept.-May) a special section: School library journal, ISSN 0000-0035, (called Junior libraries, 1954-May 1961). Also issued separately.
Great Athletes
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Harvey Penick, Bud Shrake, Edwin Shrake
Categories: Athletes
Type: BOOK - Published: 2010 - Publisher:

Books about Great Athletes