Wonder and Exile in the New World

Cervantes's novels were stimulated by the geographical excitement of a new world. The rise of the early modern novel came on the heels of the incorporation of the Indies into European maps and legal documents.” See Cervantes, the Novel, ...

Wonder and Exile in the New World

Wonder and Exile in the New World

In Wonder and Exile in the New World, Alex Nava explores the border regions between wonder and exile, particularly in relation to the New World. It traces the preoccupation with the concept of wonder in the history of the Americas, beginning with the first European encounters, goes on to investigate later representations in the Baroque age, and ultimately enters the twentieth century with the emergence of so-called magical realism. In telling the story of wonder in the New World, Nava gives special attention to the part it played in the history of violence and exile, either as a force that supported and reinforced the Conquest or as a voice of resistance and decolonization. Focusing on the work of New World explorers, writers, and poets—and their literary descendants—Nava finds that wonder and exile have been two of the most significant metaphors within Latin American cultural, literary, and religious representations. Beginning with the period of the Conquest, especially with Cabeza de Vaca and Las Casas, continuing through the Baroque with Cervantes and Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, and moving into the twentieth century with Alejo Carpentier and Miguel Ángel Asturias, Nava produces a historical study of Latin American narrative in which religious and theological perspectives figure prominently.

Cervantes the Novel and the New World

Moving beyond an inventory of Cervantes's references to the Indies - to Mexico and Peru, cannibals and tobacco, parrots and alligators - this study interprets his novels as a transatlantic, cross-cultural, and multi-linguistic achievement.

Cervantes  the Novel  and the New World

Cervantes the Novel and the New World

Moving beyond an inventory of Cervantes's references to the Indies - to Mexico and Peru, cannibals and tobacco, parrots and alligators - this study interprets his novels as a transatlantic, cross-cultural, and multi-linguistic achievement

Writing Captivity in the Early Modern Atlantic

Circulations of Knowledge and Authority in the Iberian and English Imperial Worlds Lisa Voigt ... from Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca's account ofshipwreck and captivity in North America to tales of Algerian captivity in Cervantes's novels ...

Writing Captivity in the Early Modern Atlantic

Writing Captivity in the Early Modern Atlantic

Drawing on texts written by and about European and Euro-American captives in a variety of languages and genres, Lisa Voigt explores the role of captivity in the production of knowledge, identity, and authority in the early modern imperial world. The practice of captivity attests to the violence that infused relations between peoples of different faiths and cultures in an age of extraordinary religious divisiveness and imperial ambitions. But as Voigt demonstrates, tales of Christian captives among Muslims, Amerindians, and hostile European nations were not only exploited in order to emphasize cultural oppositions and geopolitical hostilities. Voigt's examination of Spanish, Portuguese, and English texts reveals another early modern discourse about captivity--one that valorized the knowledge and mediating abilities acquired by captives through cross-cultural experience. Voigt demonstrates how the flexible identities of captives complicate clear-cut national, colonial, and religious distinctions. Using fictional and nonfictional, canonical and little-known works about captivity in Europe, North Africa, and the Americas, Voigt exposes the circulation of texts, discourses, and peoples across cultural borders and in both directions across the Atlantic.

Cervantes And on in the New World

Ticknor's notion of Don Quijote as the first modern novel ties in nicely with the line of thought that Diana de Armas Wilson developed in her classic Cervantes , the Novel and the New World , the major contribution to the field of Trans ...

Cervantes And on in the New World

Cervantes And on in the New World


Cervantes s Novel of Modern Times

A similar story of worldly success achieved in the New World is told at the beginning of Cervantes's novella, El celoso estremeno. 38. See Hampton, Writing from History, pp. 265–66. The issue of the exemplary hero allows Hampton to ...

Cervantes s Novel of Modern Times

Cervantes s Novel of Modern Times


Cervantes Epic Novel

32 In Cervantes, the Novel, and the New World, Wilson argues that novels have emerged and re-emerged since antiquity to express ideological transgression and cultural hybridity and that America – by way of parody of the New World ...

Cervantes  Epic Novel

Cervantes Epic Novel

This study sets out to help restore "Persiles" to pride of place within Cervantes's corpus by reading it as the author's "summa," as a boldly new kind of prose epic that casts an original light on the major political, religious, social, and literary debates of its era.

Cervantes in Algiers

Juan Goytisolo , Crónicas sarracinas ( Barcelona : Ibérica , 1982 ) , 60–61 ; see also Diana de Armas Wilson's pioneering book , Cervantes , the Novel , and the New World ( New York : Oxford University Press , 2001 ) .

Cervantes in Algiers

Cervantes in Algiers

Returning to Spain after fighting in the Battle of Lepanto and other Mediterranean campaigns against the Turks, the soldier Miguel de Cervantes was captured by Barbary pirates and taken captive to Algiers. The five years he spent in the Algerian bagnios or prison-houses (1575-1580) made an indelible impression on his works. From the first plays and narratives written after his release to his posthumous novel, the story of Cervantes's traumatic experience continuously speaks through his writings. Cervantes in Algiers offers a comprehensive view of his life as a slave and, particularly, of the lingering effects this traumatic experience had on his literary production. No work has documented in such vivid and illuminating detail the socio-political world of sixteenth-century Algiers, Cervantes's life in the prison-house, his four escape attempts, and the conditions of his final ransom. Garces's portrait of a sophisticated multi-ethnic culture in Algiers, moreover, is likely to open up new discussions about early modern encounters between Christians and Muslims. By bringing together evidence from many different sources, historical and literary, Garces reconstructs the relations between Christians, Muslims, and renegades in a number of Cervantes's writings. The idea that survivors of captivity need to repeat their story in order to survive (an insight invoked from Coleridge to Primo Levi to Dori Laub) explains not only Cervantes's storytelling but also the book that theorizes it so compellingly. As a former captive herself (a hostage of Colombian guerrillas), the author reads and listens to Cervantes with another ear.

Approaches to Teaching Cervantes s Don Quixote

De Armas Wilson, in Cervantes, the Novel, and the New World, and Héctor Brioso Santos and José Montero Reguera, in Cervantes y América (“Cervantes and America”), turn our attention to the role played by the Americas in Cervantes's life ...

Approaches to Teaching Cervantes s Don Quixote

Approaches to Teaching Cervantes s Don Quixote

This second edition of Approaches to Teaching Cervantes's Don Quixote highlights dramatic changes in pedagogy and scholarship in the last thirty years: today, critics and teachers acknowledge that subject position, cultural identity, and political motivations afford multiple perspectives on the novel, and they examine both literary and sociohistorical contextualization with fresh eyes. Part 1, "Materials," contains information about editions of Don Quixote, a history and review of the English translations, and a survey of critical studies and Internet resources. In part 2, "Approaches," essays cover such topics as the Moors of Spain in Cervantes's time; using film and fine art to teach his novel; and how to incorporate psychoanalytic theory, satire, science and technology, gender, role-playing, and other topics and techniques in a range of twenty-first-century classroom settings.

New World Gold

The transition from feudal society to capitalism perceived through the lens of Cervantes is the concern in Johnson, Cervantes and the Material World, and Quint, Cervantes's Novel of Modern Times. On this topic see also Galindo Martín, ...

New World Gold

New World Gold

The discovery of the New World was initially a cause for celebration. But the vast amounts of gold that Columbus and other explorers claimed from these lands altered Spanish society. The influx of such wealth contributed to the expansion of the Spanish empire, but also it raised doubts and insecurities about the meaning and function of money, the ideals of court and civility, and the structure of commerce and credit. New World Gold shows that, far from being a stabilizing force, the flow of gold from the Americas created anxieties among Spaniards and shaped a host of distinct behaviors, cultural practices, and intellectual pursuits on both sides of the Atlantic. Elvira Vilches examines economic treatises, stories of travel and conquest, moralist writings, fiction, poetry, and drama to reveal that New World gold ultimately became a problematic source of power that destabilized Spain’s sense of trust, truth, and worth. These cultural anxieties, she argues, rendered the discovery of gold paradoxically disastrous for Spanish society. Combining economic thought, social history, and literary theory in trans-Atlantic contexts, New World Gold unveils the dark side of Spain’s Golden Age.

The Cervanrean Heritage

influences arising from 'the geopolitics swirling around the matter of America — its conquest and colonization by a ... Wilson develops a comparative study of Cervantes novel, its American sources and how both played their part in the ...

The Cervanrean Heritage

The Cervanrean Heritage

"Many critics regard Cervantes's Don Quixote as the most influential literary book on British literature. Indeed the impact on British authors was immense, as can be seen from 17th-century plays by Fletcher, Massinger and Beaumont, through the great 18th-century novels of Fielding, Smollett, Sterne, and Lennox, and on into more modern and contemporary novelists. 20th-century critics, fascinated by Cervantes, were moved to write what we now see as the classical works of Cervantes scholarship. Through their previous publications, the eminent contributors to this volume have helped to determine the reception of Cervantes in Britain. Together they now offer a comprehensive and innovative picture of this topic, discussing the English translations of Cervantes's works, the literary genres which developed under his shadow, and the best-known authors who consciously emulated him. Cervantes's influence upon British literature emerges as decidedly the deepest of any writer outside of English and, very possibly, of any writer since the Renaissance."

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