A Rosicrucian Utopia in Eighteenth Century Russia

This is the first investigation of the history of Russian Freemasonry, based on the premise that the facts of the Russian Enlightenment preclude application of the interpretative framework commonly used for the history of western thought.

A Rosicrucian Utopia in Eighteenth Century Russia

A Rosicrucian Utopia in Eighteenth Century Russia

This is the first investigation of the history of Russian Freemasonry, based on the premise that the facts of the Russian Enlightenment preclude application of the interpretative framework commonly used for the history of western thought. Coverage includes the development of early Russian masonry, the formation of the Novikov circle in Moscow, the ‘programme’ of Rosicrucianism and its Russian variant and, finally, the clash between the Rosicrucians and the State.

Theological Reflection in Eighteenth Century Russia

A Rosicrucian Utopia in Eighteenth-Century Russia: The Masonic Circle of N.I. Novikov. Dordrecht: Springer. Fonvizin, Denis. 1959. Денис И. Фонвизин, Собрание сочинений, Москва: Государственное Издательство Художественной Литературы.

Theological Reflection in Eighteenth Century Russia

Theological Reflection in Eighteenth Century Russia

The book examines the wide panorama of Russian theological reflection found in a variety of sources--ecclesiastical books, sermons, literature, poetry, theater, historical treatises, scholarly works, and free translations of theology books. It presents not only the reflections of authors who remained in the framework of the official Orthodox theology, but also dissenters, primarily Old Believers and masons, who often sought to infuse Orthodox Christianity with a more personal approach.

Russian Utopia

18 Douglas Smith, Working the Rough Stone: Freemasonry and Society in Eighteenth-Century Russia (DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 1999); Raffaela Faggionato, A Rosicrucian Utopia in Eighteenth-Century Russia: The Masonic ...

Russian Utopia

Russian Utopia

Mark D. Steinberg explores the work of individuals he recognizes as utopians during the most dramatic period in Russian and Soviet history. It has long been a cliché to argue that Russian revolutionary movements have been inspired by varieties of 'utopian dreaming' – claims which, although not wrong, are too often used uncritically. For the first time, Russian Utopian digs deeper and asks what utopians meant at the level of ideas, emotions, and lived experience. Despite the fact that many would have resisted the 'utopian' label at the time because of its dismissive meanings, Steinberg's comprehensive approach sees him take in political leaders, intellectuals, writers, and artists (visual, material, and musical), as well as workers, peasants, soldiers, students and others. Ideologically, the figures discussed range from reactionaries to anarchists, nationalists (including non-Russians) to feminists, both religious believers and 'the militant godless'. This innovative text dissects the very notion of the Russian utopian and examines its significance in its various fascinating contexts.

The Russian Empire 1450 1801

H. Whittaker, Russian Monarchy: EighteenthCentury Rulers and Writers in Political Dialogue (DeKalb, Ill.: Northern Illinois ... A Rosicrucian Utopia in EighteenthCentury Russia: The Masonic Circle of N. I. Novikov (Dordrecht: Springer, ...

The Russian Empire 1450 1801

The Russian Empire 1450 1801

Modern Russian identity and historical experience has been largely shaped by Russia's imperial past: an empire that was founded in the early modern era and endures in large part today. The Russian Empire 1450-1801 surveys how the areas that made up the empire were conquered and how they were governed. It considers the Russian empire a 'Eurasian empire', characterized by a 'politics of difference': the rulers and their elites at the center defined the state's needs minimally - with control over defense, criminal law, taxation, and mobilization of resources - and otherwise tolerated local religions, languages, cultures, elites, and institutions. The center related to communities and religions vertically, according each a modicum of rights and autonomies, but didn't allow horizontal connections across nobilities, townsmen, or other groups potentially with common interests to coalesce. Thus, the Russian empire was multi-ethnic and multi-religious; Nancy Kollmann gives detailed attention to the major ethnic and religious groups, and surveys the government's strategies of governance - centralized bureaucracy, military reform, and a changed judicial system. The volume pays particular attention to the dissemination of a supranational ideology of political legitimacy in a variety of media - written sources and primarily public ritual, painting, and particularly architecture. Beginning with foundational features, such as geography, climate, demography, and geopolitical situation, The Russian Empire 1450-1801 explores the empire's primarily agrarian economy, serfdom, towns and trade, as well as the many religious groups - primarily Orthodoxy, Islam, and Buddhism. It tracks the emergence of an 'Imperial nobility' and a national self-consciousness that was, by the end of the eighteenth century, distinctly imperial, embracing the diversity of the empire's many peoples and cultures.

Logos im Dialogos

Bis zum letzten Drittel des 18. ... 5 Siehe dazu: R. Faggionati, A Rosicrucian Utopia in Eighteenth ... Freemasonry and Society in Eighteenth-Century Russia, Illinois 1999; T. Sokolovskaja, Russkoe masonstvo i ego znaöenie v istorii ...

Logos im Dialogos

Logos im Dialogos


Russian Bible Wars

... lodges entered Russia.4 The impact of freemasonry upon the Russian nobility became substantially greater in the last third of the eighteenth century, when Russian freemasonry, partly under the influence of new Rosicrucian lodges, ...

Russian Bible Wars

Russian Bible Wars

This first comprehensive history of the Russian Bible demonstrates how scriptural translation exposed serious divisions in modern Russian religious culture.

Personality and Place in Russian Culture

... light of Platon's contribution to the Russian Enlightenment is the notion of an eighteenth-century church and clergy that had become ... A Rosicrucian Utopia in Eighteenth-Century Russia: The Masonic Circle of N. I. Novikov, trans.

Personality and Place in Russian Culture

Personality and Place in Russian Culture

Lindsey Hughes (1949-2007) made her reputation as one of the foremost historians of the age of Peter the Great by revealing the more freakish aspects of the tsar's complex mind and reconstructing the various physical environments in which he lived. Contributors to Personality and Place in Russian Culture were encouraged to develop any of the approaches featured in Hughes's work: pointillist and panoramic, playful and morbid, quotidian and bizarre. The result is a rich and original collection, ranging from the sixteenth century to the present day, in which a group of leading international scholars explore the role of the individual in Russian culture, the myriad variety of individual lives, and the changing meanings invested in particular places. The editor, Simon Dixon, is Sir Bernard Pares Professor of Russian History at UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies.

Thinking Orthodox in Modern Russia

For recent characterizations of the eighteenth-century Church as intellectually and spiritually moribund, see Raffaella Faggionato, A Rosicrucian Utopia in EighteenthCentury Russia: The Masonic Circle ofN. I. Novikov, trans.

Thinking Orthodox in Modern Russia

Thinking Orthodox in Modern Russia

This collection of essays on Russian religious thought focuses on the extent to which Russian culture and ideology has been informed by the nation s roots in Orthodox Christianity. "

Historians and Historical Societies in the Public Life of Imperial Russia

Douglas Smith, Working the Rough Stone: Freemasonry and Society in EighteenthCentury Russia (DeKalb: Northern ... 1998), 281–304; Raffaella Faggionato, A Rosicrucian Utopia in Eighteenth-Century Russia: The Masonic Circle of N. I. ...

Historians and Historical Societies in the Public Life of Imperial Russia

Historians and Historical Societies in the Public Life of Imperial Russia

What was the role of historians and historical societies in the public life of imperial Russia? Focusing on the Society of Zealots of Russian Historical Education (1895–1918), Vera Kaplan analyzes the network of voluntary associations that existed in imperial Russia, showing how they interacted with state, public, and private bodies. Unlike most Russian voluntary associations of the late imperial period, the Zealots were conservative in their view of the world. Yet, like other history associations, the group conceived their educational mission broadly, engaging academic and amateur historians, supporting free public libraries, and widely disseminating the historical narrative embraced by the Society through periodicals. The Zealots were champions of voluntary association and admitted members without regard to social status, occupation, or gender. Kaplan's study affirms the existence of a more substantial civil society in late imperial Russia and one that could endorse a modernist program without an oppositional liberal agenda.

The Russian Cosmists

Ibid. Ibid., 64. Ibid., 61. Raffaella Faggionato, A Rosicrucian Utopia in Eighteenth-Century Russia: The Masonic Circle ofN. I. Novikov (Dordrecht, the Netherlands: Springer, 2005). Tatiana Artemyeva, “Utopian Spaces of Russian Masons ...

The Russian Cosmists

The Russian Cosmists

In the nineteenth and early twentieth century, a controversial school of Russian religious and scientific thinkers emerged, united in the conviction that humanity was entering a new stage of evolution and must assume a new, active, managerial role in the cosmos. The ideas of the Cosmists have in recent decades been rediscovered and embraced by many Russian intellectuals. In the first account in English of this fascinating tradition, George M. Young offers a dynamic and wide-ranging examination of the lives and ideas of the Russian Cosmists.

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