Federal Lab Technology Transfer

Finally, this work calls for a challenge for action so that the United States itself will be the primary beneficiary of the vast new technological resource represented by our federal laboratories.

Federal Lab Technology Transfer

Federal Lab Technology Transfer

Within business and government circles, attention has recently been given to the need to strengthen the ties between federal laboratories and the private sector. Federal Lab Technology Transfer examines current technology transfer efforts between these two sectors and discusses the prospects for increased transfer to private companies. This book identifies problems and issues that have created the steer clear attitude of private businesses toward the federal bureaucratic red tape related to the transfer process. The essays highlight critical factors contributing to the success or failure of the technology transfer process. Finally, this work calls for a challenge for action so that the United States itself will be the primary beneficiary of the vast new technological resource represented by our federal laboratories.

Technology Transfer

In recent years, FLC created new initiatives to provide a clearinghouse for technology transfer opportunities. GAO was asked to review FLC's efforts to provide information on technology transfer opportunities.

Technology Transfer

Technology Transfer

The federal government spends about one-third of its annual research and development budget at hundreds of federal agency labs. Technology generated by this research may have application beyond agencies' immediate goals if commercialized by the private sector. For example, federal research has contributed to innovative products, including antibiotics and the Internet. FLC, a nationwide consortium of federal labs, helps labs transfer technology to the private sector. In recent years, FLC created new initiatives to provide a clearinghouse for technology transfer opportunities. GAO was asked to review FLC's efforts to provide information on technology transfer opportunities. This report assesses (1) the extent to which FLC has communicated with potential customers when designing and implementing its clearinghouse initiatives, and (2) how FLC measured the results of those initiatives. GAO reviewed relevant laws and FLC guidance, and interviewed a nonprobability sample of officials from four federal agencies with the highest research budgets, and a spectrum of eight customer groups, among others. GAO recommends, among other things, that FLC work collaboratively with agency and lab members to increase communication with potential customers to obtain feedback and improve its clearinghouse initiatives, and develop performance measures.

A Study of Federal Technology Transfer to the Commercial Sector

Overall, the results of the study support the findings of previous research. Recommendations are offered to help make technology transfer and the implementation of the 1986 Act a success.

A Study of Federal Technology Transfer to the Commercial Sector

A Study of Federal Technology Transfer to the Commercial Sector

The Federal Technology Transfer Act of 1986 imposed legislative requirements on federal labs to take certain actions to facilitate the transfer of federally developed technology to the commercial sector. This study examined the requirements of the 1986 Act and had the following three specific objectives: 1) to examine opportunities and barriers, as perceived by federal laboratory personnel, to the commercial application of federally developed technology to the private sector, 2) to examine the perceptions of federal laboratory personnel regarding the 1986 Act, and 3) to use the information from the first two objectives to suggest ways to ease and enhance the ever challenging process of technology transfer. A survey of 479 federal lab personnel including both managers and scientists/engineers was conducted in support of the above objectives. Overall, the results of the study support the findings of previous research. Recommendations are offered to help make technology transfer and the implementation of the 1986 Act a success.

Licensing in the Federal Laboratory

Discusses the roles of licensing in commercializing technology developed within federal laboratories and examines specific techniques for licensing such technology.

Licensing in the Federal Laboratory

Licensing in the Federal Laboratory

Discusses the roles of licensing in commercializing technology developed within federal laboratories and examines specific techniques for licensing such technology. Includes a detailed appendix on intellectual property and the basics of a license agreement.

Transfer of Technology from the Federal Laboratories

Transfer of Technology from the Federal Laboratories

Transfer of Technology from the Federal Laboratories


Meeting the Needs of People With Disabilities Through Federal Technology Transfer

Witnesses: Katherine Seelman, Director, Nat. Inst. of Rehabilitation and Research, U.S. Dept. of Education; C. Dan Brand, Chairman, Fed. Lab.

Meeting the Needs of People With Disabilities Through Federal Technology Transfer

Meeting the Needs of People With Disabilities Through Federal Technology Transfer

Witnesses: Katherine Seelman, Director, Nat. Inst. of Rehabilitation and Research, U.S. Dept. of Education; C. Dan Brand, Chairman, Fed. Lab. Consortium for Technology Transfer, Associate Director for Technology Advancement, U.S. Food and Drug Admin./National Center for Toxicological Research; Bruce Webbon, Chief, Commercial Technology, Ames Research Center, NASA, Moffet Field, CA; Steve Jacobs, Executive Assistant to the President, NCR Corp., Dayton, OH; David H. Hershberger, V.P. of Product Development, Prentke Romich Co., Wooster, OH: and Joe Lahoud, Pres., LC Technologies, Fairfax, VA.

From Lab to Market

The topic of this book, the commercialization of public-sector technology, continues to grow in importance in the United States and sirnilarsocieties.

From Lab to Market

From Lab to Market

The topic of this book, the commercialization of public-sector technology, continues to grow in importance in the United States and sirnilarsocieties. The issues involved are relevant to many roles including those of policy makers, managers, patent attorneys, licensing agents, and technical staff members of public technology sources. Institutions increasingly involved in the process include federal and other governmentallaboratories and their related agencies, public universities and their state governments, public and private transfer agents and, of course, all the private recipients of public technology. Scarcely a day goes by without a significant event related to technology transfer and commercialization. The popular business press is regularly carrying articles addressing the issues, explaining new initiatives and describing events of notable success or failure.[l] As an example of current important events, the Technology Reinvestment Project (TRP) is forrnu lating its initiatives totransfer public technology and promote technology-based publiclprivate partnerships as a collaboration between the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the National Science Foundation (NSF) the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the Department of Energy, Defense Programs (DOE/DP).

Technology Transfer Obstacles in Federal Laboratories

Ling observed that transfer efforts at federal labs are " modest , of variable quality and typically passive . ... barriers to government laboratory technology transfer remain " in spite of various policy initiatives in recent years .

Technology Transfer Obstacles in Federal Laboratories

Technology Transfer Obstacles in Federal Laboratories


The Role of the Federal Laboratories in Domestic Technology Transfer

The laboratory consortium now has a secretariat , and a number of the laboratories carry out an extensive technology transfer function singly , or through other umbrellas or networks , e.g. , the California Innovation Group and the New ...

The Role of the Federal Laboratories in Domestic Technology Transfer

The Role of the Federal Laboratories in Domestic Technology Transfer


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