Mexican American Civil Rights in Texas

Inspired by a 1968 U.S. Commission on Civil Rights six-day hearing in San Antonio that introduced the Mexican American people to the rest of the nation, this book is an examination of the social change of Mexican Americans of Texas over the ...

Mexican American Civil Rights in Texas

Mexican American Civil Rights in Texas

Inspired by a 1968 U.S. Commission on Civil Rights six-day hearing in San Antonio that introduced the Mexican American people to the rest of the nation, this book is an examination of the social change of Mexican Americans of Texas over the past half century. The San Antonio hearing included 1,502 pages of testimony, given by more than seventy witnesses, which became the baseline twenty experts used to launch their research on Mexican American civil rights issues during the following fifty years. These experts explored the changes in demographics and policies with regard to immigration, voting rights, education, employment, economic security, housing, health, and criminal justice. While there are a number of anecdotal historical accounts of Mexican Americans in Texas, this book adds an evidence-based examination of racial and ethnic inequalities and changes over the past half century. The contributors trace the litigation on behalf of Latinos and other minorities in state and federal courts and the legislative changes that followed, offering public policy recommendations for the future. The fact that this study is grounded in Texas is significant, as it was the birthplace of a majority of Chicano civil rights efforts and is at the heart of Mexican American growth and talent, producing the first Mexican American in Congress, the first Mexican American federal judge, and the first Mexican American candidate for president. As the largest ethnic group in the state, Latinos will continue to play a major role in the future of Texas.

Encyclopedia of the Mexican American Civil Rights Movement

Entries ranging in length from a paragraph to several pages document the Mexican American civil right movement.

Encyclopedia of the Mexican American Civil Rights Movement

Encyclopedia of the Mexican American Civil Rights Movement

Entries ranging in length from a paragraph to several pages document the Mexican American civil right movement.

The Civil Rights Movement in Texas

With riveting text, authentic photographs, and revealing primary sources, this book deeply examines the history of the civil rights movement in Texas.

The Civil Rights Movement in Texas

The Civil Rights Movement in Texas

With riveting text, authentic photographs, and revealing primary sources, this book deeply examines the history of the civil rights movement in Texas. Readers will learn about the cultural tension and struggles of minorities from the beginning of Texas statehood until the mid-1900s. The text highlights key figures, as well as the organizations that contributed to social justice in Texas. Thorough inspection of the major events and social climate of the times gives readers an understanding of this major era in U.S. history, with a special focus on its presence in Texas.

No Mexicans Women Or Dogs Allowed

Cynthia Orozco also provides evidence that perceptions of LULAC as a petite bourgeoisie, assimilationist, conservative, anti-Mexican, anti-working class organization belie the realities of the group's early activism.

No Mexicans  Women  Or Dogs Allowed

No Mexicans Women Or Dogs Allowed

Founded by Mexican American men in 1929, the League of United Latin-American Citizens (LULAC) has usually been judged according to Chicano nationalist standards of the late 1960s and 1970s. Drawing on extensive archival research, including the personal papers of Alonso S. Perales and Adela Sloss-Vento, No Mexicans, Women, or Dogs Allowed presents the history of LULAC in a new light, restoring its early twentieth-century context. Cynthia Orozco also provides evidence that perceptions of LULAC as a petite bourgeoisie, assimilationist, conservative, anti-Mexican, anti-working class organization belie the realities of the group's early activism. Supplemented by oral history, this sweeping study probes LULAC's predecessors, such as the Order Sons of America, blending historiography and cultural studies. Against a backdrop of the Mexican Revolution, World War I, gender discrimination, and racial segregation, No Mexicans, Women, or Dogs Allowed recasts LULAC at the forefront of civil rights movements in America.

Mexican American Civil Rights Movement

This volume introduces readers to the historical background of the Mexican American civil rights movement, as well as its key figures and events.

Mexican American Civil Rights Movement

Mexican American Civil Rights Movement

Since the days of westward expansion and the U.S.-Mexican War, people of Mexican descent have faced great discrimination in the United States. This volume introduces readers to the historical background of the Mexican American civil rights movement, as well as its key figures and events. Photographs and primary sources will transport readers back in time to truly grasp the importance of this movement. Readers will learn about current issues pertaining to Mexican Americans and immigration, and learn what they could do to advance the movement for equality.

The Struggle in Black and Brown

This volume, which considers relations between blacks and browns during the civil rights era, carefully examines the complex and multifaceted realities that complicate such assumptions—and that revise our view of both the civil rights ...

The Struggle in Black and Brown

The Struggle in Black and Brown

It might seem that African Americans and Mexican Americans would have common cause in matters of civil rights. This volume, which considers relations between blacks and browns during the civil rights era, carefully examines the complex and multifaceted realities that complicate such assumptions—and that revise our view of both the civil rights struggle and black-brown relations in recent history. Unique in its focus, innovative in its methods, and broad in its approach to various locales and time periods, the book provides key perspectives to understanding the development of America’s ethnic and sociopolitical landscape. These essays focus chiefly on the Southwest, where Mexican Americans and African Americans have had a long history of civil rights activism. Among the cases the authors take up are the unification of black and Chicano civil rights and labor groups in California; divisions between Mexican Americans and African Americans generated by the War on Poverty; and cultural connections established by black and Chicano musicians during the period. Together these cases present the first truly nuanced picture of the conflict and cooperation, goodwill and animosity, unity and disunity that played a critical role in the history of both black-brown relations and the battle for civil rights. Their insights are especially timely, as black-brown relations occupy an increasingly important role in the nation’s public life.

World War II and Mexican American Civil Rights

In this book, Richard Griswold del Castillo and Richard Steele investigate how the wartime experiences of Mexican Americans helped forge their civil rights consciousness and how the US government responded.

World War II and Mexican American Civil Rights

World War II and Mexican American Civil Rights

World War II marked a turning point for Mexican Americans that fundamentally changed their expectations about how they should be treated by the greater U.S. society. The experiences of fighting alongside white Americans in the military, as well as of working in factory jobs for wages equal to those of Anglo workers, made Mexican Americans less willing to tolerate the second-class citizenship that had been their lot before the war. Having proven their loyalty and “Americanness” during World War II, Mexican Americans in the postwar years wanted to have the civil rights they knew they had earned. In this book, Richard Griswold del Castillo and Richard Steele investigate how the World War II experiences of Mexican Americans galvanized their struggle for civil rights and how the U.S. government responded to the needs and aspirations of Mexican Americans. The authors demonstrate, for example, that the U.S. government “discovered” Mexican Americans during World War II and set about addressing some of their problems as a way of forestalling a sense of grievance and disaffection that might have made the Mexican American community unwilling to support the war effort. The authors also show that, as much or more than governmental programs, the personal wartime experiences of Mexican Americans formed their civil rights consciousness. The book concludes with a selection of key essays and historical documents from the World War II period that collectively gives a first-person understanding of the civil rights struggles of Mexican Americans.

Texas Mexican Americans and Postwar Civil Rights

In this volume, she draws upon the vast resources of the Voces Project, as well as archives in other parts of the country, to tell the stories of three little-known advancements in Mexican American civil rights.

Texas Mexican Americans and Postwar Civil Rights

Texas Mexican Americans and Postwar Civil Rights

After World War II, Mexican American veterans returned home to lead the civil rights struggles of the fifties, sixties, and seventies. Many of their stories have been recorded by the Voces Oral History Project (formerly the U.S. Latino & Latina World War II Oral History Project), founded and directed by Maggie Rivas-Rodriguez at the University of Texas at Austin School of Journalism. In this volume, she draws upon the vast resources of the Voces Project, as well as archives in other parts of the country, to tell the stories of three little-known advancements in Mexican American civil rights. The first two stories recount local civil rights efforts that typified the grassroots activism of Mexican Americans across the Southwest. One records the successful effort led by parents to integrate the Alpine, Texas, public schools in 1969—fifteen years after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that separate schools were inherently unconstitutional. The second describes how El Paso's first Mexican American mayor, Raymond Telles, quietly challenged institutionalized racism to integrate the city's police and fire departments, thus opening civil service employment to Mexican Americans. The final account provides the first history of the early days of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund (MALDEF) and its founder Pete Tijerina Jr. from MALDEF's incorporation in San Antonio in 1968 until its move to San Francisco in 1972.

Vicente Ximenes LBJ s Great Society and Mexican American Civil Rights Rhetoric

Mouffe, Chantal. The Democratic Paradox. New York: Verso, 2009. Orosco, Cynthia. No Mexicans, Women, or Dogs Allowed: The Rise of the Mexican American Civil Rights Movement. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2010. Peña, Devon, ed.

Vicente Ximenes  LBJ s Great Society  and Mexican American Civil Rights Rhetoric

Vicente Ximenes LBJ s Great Society and Mexican American Civil Rights Rhetoric

Starting as a grassroots organizer in the 1950s, Vicente Ximenes was at the forefront of the Mexican American civil rights movement for decades, becoming a high-ranking appointee in Lyndon Johnson's Great Society. Michelle Hall Kells provides a rhetorical history of his career as an activist.

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