Late Imperial Romance

To study these novelists , then , is to learn something not only about the continuities of what I am calling late imperial romance , but also about changes in what might be called the geopolitics of the imagination .

Late Imperial Romance

Late Imperial Romance

As the US imperium lurches towards its economic twilight, comparisons with the fate of the British Empire have become increasingly commonplace.

Rereading the Imperial Romance

ROMANTIC ENCHANTMENT AND CRITIQUE The postcolonial critic Benita Parry observes that : Not until the late nineteenth century and the massive land expropriations in Africa , intensified capitalist interventions in Asia , and the ...

Rereading the Imperial Romance

Rereading the Imperial Romance

"Chrisman's book demonstrates how South Africa played an important if now overlooked role in British imperial culture, and shows the impact of capitalism itself in the making of racial, gender and national identities. This book makes an original contribution to studies of Victorian literature of empire; South African literary history; African studies; black nationalism; and the literature of resistance."--BOOK JACKET.

The Clandestine Cold War in Asia 1945 65

Leslie Feidler, Love and Death in the American Novel (NY: Anchor Books 1960) p.179. 34. Supposedly one of Lansdale's favorites, ... John McClure, Late Imperial Romance (London: Verso 1994) p.3. 41. Lansdale's account of a visit to a ...

The Clandestine Cold War in Asia  1945 65

The Clandestine Cold War in Asia 1945 65

A range of clandestine Cold War activities in Asia, from intelligence and propaganda to special operations and security support, is examined here. The contributions draw on newly-opened archives and a two-day conference on the subject.

Agent of Empire

William Walker and the Imperial Self in American Literature Brady Harrison ... In Late Imperial Romance ( 1994 ) , for example , John McClure explores the influence of the literature of British imperialism on American writers .

Agent of Empire

Agent of Empire

At the heart of our ongoing interest in Walker, says Harrison, is the need to understand the ever-shifting ambitions and arguments that have driven American economic, military, and paramilitary ventures around the globe for the past 150 years.".

Reimagining Dinosaurs in Late Victorian and Edwardian Literature

John A. McClure, Late Imperial Romance (London: Verso, 1994), 8–29. 4. Michael Saler, As If: Modern Enchantment and the Literary Prehistory of Virtual Reality (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012), 15, 39. 5. Ibid., 78. 6.

Reimagining Dinosaurs in Late Victorian and Edwardian Literature

Reimagining Dinosaurs in Late Victorian and Edwardian Literature

When the term 'dinosaur' was coined in 1842, it referred to fragmentary British fossils. In subsequent decades, American discoveries—including Brontosaurus and Triceratops—proved that these so-called 'terrible lizards' were in fact hardly lizards at all. By the 1910s 'dinosaur' was a household word. Reimagining Dinosaurs in Late Victorian and Edwardian Literature approaches the hitherto unexplored fiction and popular journalism that made this scientific term a meaningful one to huge transatlantic readerships. Unlike previous scholars, who have focused on displays in American museums, Richard Fallon argues that literature was critical in turning these extinct creatures into cultural icons. Popular authors skilfully related dinosaurs to wider concerns about empire, progress, and faith; some of the most prominent, like Arthur Conan Doyle and Henry Neville Hutchinson, also disparaged elite scientists, undermining distinctions between scientific and imaginative writing. The rise of the dinosaurs thus accompanied fascinating transatlantic controversies about scientific authority.

Conrad in the Twenty First Century

What makes Conrad's imperial romance late imperial romance is his acute awareness that with colonialism and modern travel completely mapping the world, "the glamour's off" (YOS 52). Reinvented for nineteenth-century fiction by Sir ...

Conrad in the Twenty First Century

Conrad in the Twenty First Century

Best known as the author of Heart of Darkness , Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) is one of the most widely taught writers in the English language. Conrad's work has taken on a new importance in the dawning of the 21st century: in the wake of September 11 many cultural commentators returned to his novel The Secret Agent to discuss the roots of terrorism, and the overarching theme of colonialism in much of his work has positioned his writing as central to not only literature scholars, but also to postcolonial and cultural studies scholars and, more recently, to scholars interested in globalization. Reading Conrad Now is a collection of original essays by leading Conrad scholars that rereads Conrad in light of his representations of post-colonialism, of empire, imperialism, and of modernism and modernity-questions that are once again relevant today. The collection is framed by an introduction by J. Hillis Miller-one of the most important literary critics today-and a concluding extensive interview with Edward Said (one of his final interviews before his death on September 25, 2003)- the most prominent postcolonial critic-addressing his lifelong fascination with Conrad. Reading Conrad Now will be essential reading for anyone seeking a contemporary introduction to this great writer, and will be of great interest to scholars working with Conrad in a variety of fields including literary studies, cultural studies, ethnic and area studies, and postcolonial studies.

Ancient Fiction

In fact it is part of the imperial mentality or world outlook that popular cultural production and cultural artifacts should be designed to circulate stock images ... John A. McClure, “Late Imperial Romance,” Raritan 10 (1991): 111–30.

Ancient Fiction

Ancient Fiction

The essays in this volume examine the relationship between ancient fiction in the Greco-Roman world and early Jewish and Christian narratives. They consider how those narratives imitated or exploited conventions of fiction to produce forms of literature that expressed new ideas or shaped community identity within the shifting social and political climates of their own societies. Major authors and texts surveyed include Chariton, Shakespeare, Homer, Vergil, Plato, Matthew, Mark, Luke, Daniel, 3 Maccabees, the Testament of Abraham, rabbinic midrash, the Apocryphal Acts, Ezekiel the Tragedian, and the Sophist Aelian. This diverse collection reveals and examines prevalent issues and syntheses in the making: the pervasive use and subversive power of imitation, the distinction between fiction and history, and the use of history in the expression of identity.

Homoerotic Sensibilities in Late Imperial China

This 'male-romance' made such an impression on the Qing dynasty literati that whenever they commemorated Chen Weisong, who was the most outstanding ci poet of late imperial China, glowing reference was always also made to Purple-Clouds.

Homoerotic Sensibilities in Late Imperial China

Homoerotic Sensibilities in Late Imperial China

Homoerotic Sensibilities in Late Imperial China combines literary and historical analysis to identify the modes of existence of male homoerotic sensibilities in late imperial China.

Literature Partition and the Nation State

What emerges at this point , McClure argues , is a new kind of romance - ' late imperial romance ' - which offers a critique of imperialism but still remains complicit in its ideology . In works such as Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness ...

Literature  Partition and the Nation State

Literature Partition and the Nation State

The history of partition in the 20th-century is one steeped in

Meeting Without Knowing It

The Speckled Bird was originally planned as a tale of romance and treasure',” based perhaps on Yeats's reading of ... the blank gulfs of Africa invaded by cartographers' pencil marks, are exemplary of this late imperial romance'.

Meeting Without Knowing It

Meeting Without Knowing It

Meeting Without Knowing It compares Rudyard Kipling and W.B. Yeats in the formative phase of their careers, from their births in 1865 up to 1903. The argument consists of parallel readings wed to a biographic structure. Reading the two poets in parallel often yields remarkable discursive echoes. For example, both men were similarly preoccupied with the visual arts, with heroism, with folklore, balladry and the demotic voice. Both struck vatic postures, and made bids for public authority premised on an appeal to what they considered the 'mythopoeic' impulse in fin de siècle culture. My methodology consists in identifying these mutual echoes in their poetry and political rhetoric, before charting them against intersections in their lives. Kipling and Yeats were, for much of their careers, irreconcilable political enemies. However, a cross-reading of the two poets' bardic ambitions, heroic tropes and interpretations of history reveals that, to achieve their opposed political ends, they frequently partook of a common discourse. Supplementing this analysis with biographical context, we can trace these shared concerns to their late 19th century artistic upbringing, and to the closely linked social circles which they inhabited in fin de siècle London. It is, in fact, their very mutuality during the 1890s which lent rancour to their ideological division after the Boer War. In turn, acrimony and denunciation only served to bind together all the more intimately, in an argumentative spiral of revolving discourses, two men who were often proximate but who actually met only in cartoons and satirical gossip.

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